Pacific Crest Trail

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The Pacific Crest Trail is a long-distance mountain hiking trail that runs from the United States border with Mexico to its border with Canada. It passes through the Laguna, San Jacinto, San Bernardino, San Gabriel, Liebre, Tehachapi Mountains, and the Sierra Nevada in California, and the Cascade Range in Oregon and Washington states. The Pacific Crest Trail is 2,650 miles (4,240 km) long. It was designated a National Scenic Trail in 1993. The Pacific Crest Trail, the Appalachian Trail, and the Continental Divide Trail form the Triple Crown of long distance hiking.

Each year, about 300 people, commonly called thru-hikers, attempt to hike the entire trail from end-to-end. The trip usually takes between four and six months. Around 180 complete the hike each year. Most “thru-hikers” start from the southern Mexican border and reach the north end of the trail before the first hard snow. Picking up supplies along the way, usually packages sent to them via mail, most hikers cover about 25 miles (40 km) per day.

The Pacific Coast Trail along with the Appalachian Trail and the Continental Divide Trail form the Triple Crown of long distance hiking

View a list of Hiking Trails and Trail Systems.

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